Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Australia pre-1530:Java the Great


Due to the crash of asteroids and Tsunamis around 1530 great chunks of Australia fell in to the sea and many of the lands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans fell into the sea also. However the Shallow Sea in Australia may have expanded due to new water sources entering it from the newly created Arafura Sea. The Pamu aborigines were re-settled from their homeland in the southern Indian Ocean on the new Australian coastline and then spread out and settled round the Shallow Sea. However in 1606 due to geological events the Shallow Sea was cut off from its water outlets and rapidly dried up. 

The remnant of Java the Great Australians who survived 1530 resettled in the northern countries such as Pakistan, Afghanistan and Russia. Many of them via Arabia and India. This is why cartographers trying to intergrate pre and post 1530 maps and information had great difficulty. This is why many accounts such as Marco Polo were dismissed as fictions by many or that he was mistaken in locations as they were found to just be in the Indian Ocean where today there are no lands only water. However using google earth one sees that there was land in those areas which sunk at some time in the past.


Australia was known as Java the Great and the land of the Kerguelen Plateau (now under the Sea) was known as Java the Less. Modern day Java was known as Sunda (before overhalf of it went under the Sea and was considered part of Java the Great (Australia). Antartica was also known as Sunda.



Lesser Java and Srivijaya

Sunken Lands in Indian Ocean

Marco Polo and the Lost Continent

 

 

1 comment:

Daniel Peckham said...

I read this with great interest as I'm very interested in the pre-european history of the Indian ocean. I wonder how they teach history in Indonesia - shouldn't they mention all this if it only happened 500 years ago?, and why they would not know about this sort of thing these days, since it should all be in their records, unless the Dutch changed all the history of whats taught?